A Rose by Any Other Name?

“…a rose by any other name would smell as sweet…” ~ Juliet in Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare

“…[A] rose by any other name would smell as sweet…” – but would it really? Is Cherokee County, Oklahoma just like Cherokee County, Kansas or Cherokee County, Georgia? This week’s theme is “name’s the same”. In the past I’ve done this theme using first names. This week I wanted to do something different – taking a look at place names that are the same. Often, as immigrants moved westward they named a new place after an old place. I find that interesting so today we’re looking at same-place-names.

Cherokee County, Georgia

My mom’s BATES family started out in Georgia. I got to visit Cherokee County, Georgia a few years ago and was able to go to some of the places that played a part in the BATES family history. It looks amazingly like Cherokee County, Oklahoma. Rolling hills, lots of green trees and forests. It was a nice trip and a beautiful place.

Georgia near my 3rd great grandparents’ homeplace.

I could have chosen a better picture but the picture above is one that is special to me. I took it on my trip to Georgia. This was as close to my 3rd great grandparents’ homeplace as I could get that day.

The ancestors in my BATES line who lived in Cherokee County, Georgia were:

  • John C. and Mary Jane (MOBLEY) BATES (my 3rd great grandparents); John was born in Cherokee County, Georgia about 1818. John fought for the Confederacy during Civil War. He was a prisoner of war at Rock Island – the Yankee version of Andersonville Prison. Until recently, I thought he’d died as a prisoner of war at Rock Island. However, I discovered he was a part of a prisoner exchange. He managed to survive until his arrival in Savannah, South Carolina. There, he passed away. He was so close to home and yet so far away. I’m very proud of his service. I believe his family thought he died at Rock Island. He is recorded in the Murray County, Georgia books as having died as a prisoner of war.
John Bates
John BATES’ grave in South Carolina.
  • Jesse A. and Delila (ARENT) BATES (my 4th great grandparents); In 1832, Jesse was appointed postmaster of Hickory Flat, Cherokee County, Georgia in 1832. Jesse and Delila remained in Cherokee County, Georgia until their deaths. They are said to be buried at the Hickory Flat Cemetery but when I went I could not find their graves. After Jesse died, Delila married William JOHNSON:
Cherokee County, Georgia marriage record of Delila (ARENT) BATES and William S. JOHNSON.
  • John and Frances Lucinda “Fanny” (BURNETT) BATES (my 5th great grandparents); like Jesse and Delila, John and Fanny were supposed to be buried in Hickory Flat Cemetery. I was unable to locate their graves when I went there. Another researcher has documented other efforts to locate the graves and no one has succeeded. John BATES was a blacksmith. Fanny’s dad (John Harrison BURNETT) died in the winter of 1777/1778 at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. Which means he must have known and interacted with George WASHINGTON. What an amazing history. This is definitely going on the list of future stories to write.
  • Burwell Meadows and Elizabeth Ann “Eliza” (MANNING) MOBLEY (whose daughter, Mary MOBLEY, married into the BATES family; they are my 4th great grandparents). Reuben MANNING (father of Elizabeth MANNING MOBLEY above) wrote a deed that I especially love. The deed can be found in Henry County, Georgia, Deed Book F, p 186:

Reuben MANNING of the state of South Carolina, Chester District, sold to Burwell MOBLEY of Henry County on 12 October 1832 for the respect I have for Burwell MOBLEY and his three children which are my grandchildren: Mary Jane MOBLEY; Sarah H A MOBLEY and Joseph Manning MOBLEY, 101 1/4 acres, the east end of Lot #90 in District 12. Witnesses: William WOODWARD and Sarah WOODWARD. Recorded 11 Feb 1834.

Henry County, Georgia, Deed Book F, p 186.

“For the respect I have for Burwell MOBLEY and his three children”. That’s an amazing thing to write about a son-in-law. I love that!

  • Vashti (COLEMAN) MANNING (grandmother of Mary MOBLEY who married John BATES; my 5th great grandmother); I found a transcription of a letter to Vashti from her father-in-law, John WILLIAMSON. Vashti married It was an interesting read. I’d sure like to know the story behind it. You can see the letter here:
Letter written in 1831 to his daughter-in-law, Vashti Coleman Williamson
Transcription of a letter from John WILLIAMSON, Sr. to his daughter-in-law, Vashti (COLEMAN) MANNING WILLIAMSON.

So, as you can see – some interesting finds coming out of Cherokee County, Georgia. Georgia’s smelling pretty rosy to me!

Cherokee County, Kansas

We’re going to head west to Cherokee County, Kansas. Cherokee County, Kansas is still very green and has plenty of trees but it isn’t quite as hilly. Like it’s same-name in Georgia, it has lots of rural areas. This area of Kansas is rich in mining, though. In this single county, you can find my ancestors on both my dad’s and mom’s side, my husband’s ancestors from his dad’s side, and even the ancestors of my daughter-in-law and ex-son-in-law! Cherokee County, Kansas is a gold mine for me! Today though, I’m going to focus on my husband’s people for this area of Cherokee County, Kansas.

The one that I’m certain spent time in Cherokee County, Kansas is my husband’s great grandfather, George Benjamin PAGE. George mined in 1918. At that time, he was working in Baxter Springs, Cherokee County, Kansas at Pioneer Lead and Zinc Company. The photo below is George PAGE on his drill in Blue Goose Mine. His helper is Arie BRIGGS. The mine was located just across the state line in Picher, Ottawa County, Oklahoma but is a good example of what George did in the mines.

George PAGE on his drill with his helper Arie BRIGGS at Blue Goose Mine in Picher, Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Thanks to Gerald WILLIAMS for sharing the photo.

You can read more about George in one of my other posts:

Cherokee County, Oklahoma

It’s time to head south now to Oklahoma. Like the other two Cherokee County locations, Oklahoma has lots of rural areas and green trees. Like Georgia, it also has foothills. For this location, I’m going to focus on my Dad’s family. The following ancestors are known to have lived in Cherokee County, Oklahoma:

  • Joseph L. and Mary Elizabeth (LANE) LARKIN (my 3rd great grandparents); for a very short period between about 1906-1910, Joseph and some of his extended family lived in Cherokee County, Oklahoma. During this time they also appeared in the city directory of Tulsa. Based on all the evidence I have, I believed their permanent residence was in Cherokee County, Oklahoma but they worked in Tulsa for Tulsa Vitrified Brick and Tile Company. On the days they worked, they stayed in Tulsa and lived in a tent city near the brick plant. I believe they lived in a tent city because there is a wonderful article (well, wonderful for me- not so much for Joseph and his son William) that my sister-in-law found that talks about a fire where William lost money.
William Larkin 16 sep 1906 sun. Morning Tulsa Daily World OK -
The Morning Tulsa Daily World (Tulsa, OK), 16 September 1906.

You can find more of my posts about Joseph LARKIN or his wife, Mary Elizabeth LANE LARKIN, here:

  • William and Minerva Jane (UNDERWOOD) LARKIN (my 2nd great grandparents); this William is the William in the article above and I’m confident that his dad Joseph was living with him in the tent city in Tulsa. Listen, $55 doesn’t sound like much today but I looked it up online and his $55 in 1906 had the same purchasing power as $1,598.56 in today’s money! In addition to the money, they lost the majority of their possessions. This was a HUGE loss for the family. You can find more articles about William LARKIN here:
  • William Larkin: Farmer, Mine Owner, and Road Paver
  • Brick by Brick
  • Infant LARKIN (my 1st cousin 3 times removed); I include the infants because there is no one to remember them, so I will remember them. This baby belonged to Samuel Anglus and Frances (DEAN) LARKIN (my 2nd great granduncle and 2nd great grandaunt). The baby was born and died in 1917 while the family lived in Cherokee County, Oklahoma. The following year Frances was appointed Postmaster at McBride, Cherokee County, Oklahoma. Samuel owned a business in Hulbert, Cherokee County, Oklahoma. I imagine Samuel must have been quite a character and at some future point I hope to write his story. This article located on newspapers.com screams, “Write my story!”
SA Larkin Manslaughter
The Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City, OK), 17 March 1934.

Coming Full Circle

We’ve finally come back around to our original question – is a rose [or a Cherokee County] by any other name really just as sweet? And to that, I would give you a slightly fuller version of Juliet’s line from Romeo and Juliet, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Yes, it would. A Cherokee County is as lovely in Georgia as it is in Kansas and as it is in Oklahoma. You know, I still have at least 5 other Cherokee Counties in the US that I have not visited and to that I offer another of Juliet’s lines (although slightly modified), “O Cherokee, Cherokee, wherefore art thou, Cherokee…” to which I also respond- Alabama, Iowa, Texas, and North and South Carolina!! I’m ready to travel!

I love all three of these Cherokee Counties. Not just because these places helped sustain my ancestors and gave them a home but because they are each interesting and beautiful in their own way. Before I could afford to travel, I would pull out maps and daydream about all the places I might go some day. We have a beautiful country. I hope you are fortunate enough to be making some summer travel plans even if it’s close to home. Pull out your maps and DREAM BIG!

Wishing you the best summer travel plans,

Lisa @ Days of Our Lives Genealogy blog

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